Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #58: Something Old, New, Borrowed, and Blue

This week, Patti invites us to join her Lens Artists PC, this theme “According to an old English rhyme, these items can bring anyone good luck any time.”

Old books in an old library researchers may borrow them.

A mix of old and new buildings under the blue sky in Cork, Ireland:

Something old, new, borrowed, and blue:

Strolling in an old town of Kyoto, I saw two beautiful young women wearing a new style of kimonos in blue. There are many kimono stores in Kyoto that your can choose and borrow with a small rental fee. 

During 1990s, IM Pei was commissioned by Miho to designed the Miho Museum. Pei used the idea from a 1,500 years old Chinese folk story. Some of the collection treasures were borrowed. Walking toward the end of the tunnel, we saw the beautiful museum under the blue sky.

Many architectural critics have called this tunnel “a tunnel that supersedes time and space.”

In spring, you are like entering the Tale of Peach Blossom. Photo below is from the Miho Museum website:

Click and visit Patti’s beautiful series of “something old, new, borrowed, and blue“. Patti also provides guidelines for this challenge. Looking forward to seeing your responses to this fun photo challenge.

Remember to link your post to Patti’s post and tag it Lens-Artists to help us find your post in the WP Reader.

Next week, it’s Ann-Christine’s turn to lead the challenge. Stay tuned.

Notes:

The Peach Blossom Spring was written written by Tao Yuanming in 421 CE about a chance discovery of an ethereal utopia. The story describes how a fisherman haphazardly sailed into a river in a forest made up entirely of blossoming peach trees, where even the ground was covered by peach petals. When he reached the end of the river (or spring in some translations), the source turned out to be a grotto. Though narrow at first, he was able to squeeze through and the passage eventually reached a village… For more click here.

Thank you for visiting!

Cee’s FFC: Gardens

Japanese Rock Gardens for Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge.

Rocks symbolize islands in Japanese gardens. Thus, bridges in gardens are used to connect these “islands”, allowing visitors to walk from “island” to “island” and get different views of the garden.

Thank you, Cee for this fun theme.

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